Golden Poison Dart Frog

Golden Poison Dart Frog

Phyllobates terribilis

Eats

Golden poison adult frogs feed during the day primarily on insects they encounter on the rain forest floor. They eat flies, ants, beetles, spiders, mites, caterpillars, and maggots. Tadpoles eat whatever is available such as algae and microscopic plants, carrion, and even smaller tadpoles.

Lives

Small area of Southwest coastal Colombia, South America, but scientists are unable to determine exact range because of the risks of surveying near Colombian cartels. Goldens are at elevations of 100-200 meters above sea level in lowland rain forest with steep rocky terrain and where the forest is broken by a stream, and in an area that receives about 16 ft of rainfall annually. They prefer a temperature of about 80F and a relative humidity of 80-90 percent.

Behavior

These frogs spend most of their time on the lowland floor of the rain forest, rarely climbing trees. Both sexes fight in aggressive wrestling matches, females over males and males over territories.

Description

Depending on the microgeographic region the frogs live in, their coloration, usually a uniform metallic golden yellow, can also be deep orange or a metallic silver-green sometimes described as mint green. Some adults have black markings on the snout and toes. Juveniles are black with a pair of gold stripes along the sides of the back and underbody. They have 4 unwebbed toes on each foot and a bony teeth-like plate in their upper jaw (differing them from other dart frogs).

Did you Know?

Although all poison dart frogs are venomous, only three have poison that is lethal to humans. The golden poison frog is one of these and the most deadly. Its poison is 20 times more toxic than that of other dart frogs. It is reported that an amount of poison equal to 2-3 grains of table salt is enough to cause the death of a human. Perhaps, that is the reason their other common name is terrible frog.

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Least Concern
Least Concern
Near Threatened
Near Threatened
Vulnerable
Vulnerable
Endangered
Endangered
Critically Endangered
Critically Endangered
Extinct in the Wild
Extinct in the Wild
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